Our Blog

November 18, 2018 - 4:34pm
  • SSRI antidepressants
  • Lilies (Lilium & Hemerocallis)
  • Liquid potpourri
  • Glow jewelry and glow sticks
  • Household cleaners

The ASPCA sees an increase of certain toxins for cats during the holidays and winter months. Toxins can cause many symptoms including GI upset, salivation, seizures, or death. If your cat has gotten into any of the above toxins, contact the ASPCA Animal Poison Control Center (1-888-426-4435) and your veterinarian right away! It could be the difference between life and death.

SSRI Antidepressants

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August 20, 2018 - 4:56pm

We recently learned that D-Con changed the active ingredient in their commonly used rodent bait products, which will make treatment of these poisonings more complicated.

Most commercially available rodenticide (rat poison) products contain an ingredient that interferes with the blood’s ability to clot, called an anticoagulant. It takes a couple of days for signs of toxicity to develop. The signs include bleeding from the mouth, nose,...

July 21, 2018 - 9:53pm

Every October Animal Hospital of North Asheville participates in the Association of Pet Obesity Prevention (APOP) Annual Pet Obesity survey. Families and veterinarians are given a short questionnaire to fill out.  No personal information is shared. Surveys are collected throughout the United States and the data is reviewed.

In 2017, the Association of Pet Obesity Prevention found that the number of clinical obesity continued to increase from 2016 to 2017, affecting 60% of cats and 56% of dogs. These results indicate an...

July 20, 2018 - 10:13pm

By Amy Plankenhorn, DVM

We’d like for you to meet Diablo, a very sweet and beloved 8-year-old Chihuahua. I met Diablo about a month ago when he came in because he was having difficulty breathing. His mom said that she’d noticed his abdomen getting larger over a few weeks, but she wasn’t sure why. When I saw him, I was concerned that his belly enlargement might be fluid, and wondered if he might be in congestive heart failure. But when I felt his abdomen, I knew it wasn’t fluid. Instead he had a large, firm growth in his abdomen. He was having trouble breathing because he couldn’t...

March 21, 2018 - 9:24pm

By Dr. Kasandra Garner

When pets have “toilet” accidents, many owners assume the problem is behavioral. However, when a dog that was previously housetrained starts to urinate inside the house or a cat starts to urinate outside the litter box, the first thing an owner should do is schedule a visit with their veterinarian. Very often your pet is trying to tell you something about a physical problem or illness when they break their housetraining. 

Frequent urination with small amounts produced can be a sign of a urinary tract infection. In dogs this may mean asking to go out...

February 19, 2018 - 12:41pm

By Amy Plankenhorn, DVM

Winter, with its cold and damp weather, can be tough on arthritis sufferers. But for animals with arthritis, any time of the year can bring pain and stiffness. While cats definitely can have arthritis, today we're going to focus on hip dysplasia and hip arthritis in dogs.

What exactly is arthritis?

By definition, arthritis means painful inflammation and stiffness of the joints. When we talk about "arthritis," we're usually thinking about osteoarthritis or degenerative joint disease, which occurs when there is a breakdown in the normal...

December 18, 2017 - 11:03am

By CriticalCareDVM

With the holiday season rapidly approaching, homes around the world will begin to decorate using materials like tinsel and handmade macaroni garland on twine. Folks will make personalized gifts liked hand-knitted clothing. These materials – tinsel, twine, yarn, string – are all very enticing to our feline friends. Yet if ingested, they can create a potentially deadly predicament called a linear foreign. To help raise awareness of this issue, I’ve dedicated some time this week to sharing information about...

November 19, 2017 - 3:30pm

At the Animal Hospital of North Asheville, we are always learning! Throughout the year, our veterinarians, management, client care and patient care team members spend countless hours learning via in-house, online and off-site continuing education opportunities and veterinary conferences. October was no exception as several of our veterinarians attended national veterinary conferences throughout the United States.

In early October, Doctors Paul Duncan and Susan Wootten attended the Atlantic Coast Veterinary Conference in New Jersey. This week-long educational conference offered...

April 23, 2017 - 5:59pm

By: Dr. Kasandra Garner

Broken bones in dogs and cats are fairly common injuries. They are usually due to accidents such as being hit by a car or falling, but can occur after any traumatic event such as gunshot wounds, horse kicks, animal attacks, and being struck by a hard object such as a golf ball.

If your pet has suffered an accident, signs that there may be a broken bone include pain, swelling, or obvious malformation of a limb. If it is an “open” fracture, you may be able to see the bone sticking out of the skin.  Because there is potential for shock and/or internal...

November 21, 2016 - 7:27pm

As the weather gets colder, it is tempting to stop your parasite prevention, but the parasitic threats to your pets do not go away. Biting insects such as fleas, ticks, and mosquitoes that carry heartworm disease can persist through very cold weather. In fact, we hear a lot of reports of people finding ticks on their pets in the coldest months of winter, and even in the cold season, ticks can carry diseases such as Lyme and Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever. Intestinal parasites such as hookworms, roundworms, and whipworms are a risk all year. Be sure to protect your pet by giving monthly...

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